our-blog our-blog http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog.php Mon, 05 Nov 2018 02:49:39 +0100 FeedCreator 1.7.2 My Horse is Gaining Weight on Free Choice Forage! Why Isn’t it Working? http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/my-horse-is-gaining-weight-on-free-choice-forage-why-isn-t-it-working- <span style=”font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px; line-height: 20.8px; text-align: -webkit-center;”>Dr. Gill is in full agreement with Dr. Getty’s assessment of how to handle obesity in horses.&nbsp; Limiting hay and using anti grazing devices such as muzzles is not in the best long term interest of the horse! Please read the following blog entry to understand how to best handle over weight horses from both physiological and psychological standpoint.</span><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-style: italic; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”font-size: 18px;”><span style=”color: rgb(47, 79, 79);”><span style=”font-weight: bold;”><br><br><br>My Horse is Gaining Weight on Free Choice Forage! Why Isn’t it Working?&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-style: italic; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>True, gradual weight loss can be achieved by creating an environment that allows horses to eat and behave in sync with their normal instincts. Hormones such as insulin, cortisol, and leptin are in homeostasis, where the body achieves a state of equilibrium and performs as it should.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>It starts with making the horse feel safe. The foundation of safety is knowing that there is always something to eat. Without this, the very underpinning of health becomes unhinged. Piling supplements and expensive feeds onto this insecure footing will make a trivial, insignificant, and short-term difference.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>A steady, never-ending supply of appropriate hay/pasture will allow your horse to realize that he can eat effortlessly. In very little time, he will begin to self-regulate his forage intake and eat only what his body needs to maintain condition.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>There are cases, however, where the horse not only doesn’t self-regulate, he actually gets heavier. Why is this? And if this is your horse, is there no hope? Do you simply have to go back to restricting hay? There are several reasons why this can occur and no, you do not and should not go back to restricting hay.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Free-choice forage is fundamental but it is not enough</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>If you are expecting to simply give your horse all the hay he wants and he’ll start to miraculously lose weight, while his nutrient intake remains inadequate and there are significant stressors in his life, you will likely be disappointed. Free-choice forage feeding will, however, improve his behavior and digestive health, even without weight loss. But to have an impact on his weight, other practices need to be in place.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Four components should be considered</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>An excellent diet, stress reduction, the right environment, and patience are key ingredients to making weight loss a reality. Below are factors that can make this happen. I realize that for many of you, it is not feasible to implement all of them. My goal is to give you the ideal situation; your goal needs to be to come as close to the ideal as possible. Even making some of these changes will improve your horse’s health.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>1. Excellent Diet</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Appropriate forage</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>The hay and/or pasture need to be low in sugar and starch, as well as low in calories, because your horse will be eating a lot of it. Testing your hay is critically important. If Ethanol Soluble Carbohydrates (ESC) + Starch exceeds 11% on a dry matter basis, you’ll want to seriously consider soaking it.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn1″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref1″ name=”_ednref1″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[i]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;If the hay supply changes frequently where your horse is boarded, consider buying your own hay; even a one month’s supply is worth testing.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Pasture grazing, of course, is ideal, but it can be tricky because its sugar and starch content varies so much. It, too, is worth testing periodically at the best and worst times of the day.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn2″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref2″ name=”_ednref2″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[ii]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;The ideal is a pasture with a mix of healthful forage. Many horses can lose weight while pasture grazing in such conditions; it is the most natural, least stressful state for the horse, and provides the most nutritious whole food.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Aggressively attack inflammation</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Where there’s body fat, there’s inflammation, leading to insulin and leptin resistance. A vicious cycle ensues because leptin resistance prevents the brain from telling the horse that he’s had enough to eat, and insulin resistance tells the horse to hold on to body fat. In both of these situations, body fat increases, further exacerbating inflammation.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>To effectively reduce inflammation, boost the diet with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory herbs, key minerals, and the right balance of omega 3s to 6s, preferably from supplements that provide wholesome ingredients without the use of added preservatives.</span><a data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref9″ name=”_ednref9″ style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;Please review articles</a><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn3″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref3″ name=”_ednref3″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[iii]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;in my website’s library for specific ways to accomplish this.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Get rid of the concentrates</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Supplements can be added to a small amount of a carrier feed such as hay pellets, non-GMO beet pulp, or whole foods (avoid soy). But do not feed large amounts of any “grain” including those that contain cereal grains (oats, corn, barley, rice, etc.), molasses, or added vegetable oils; these do nothing except add unnecessary calories.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>2. Stress Reduction</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Forage restriction is incredibly stressful</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>The horse’s digestive tract is designed for a continual flow of forage; without it, the horse will be in physical pain, mental discomfort, and prone toward a hormonal response that destroys health and promotes obesity.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn4″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref4″ name=”_ednref4″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[iv]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;If he runs out of forage, even for a few minutes, your horse’s system will register this as an impending famine and his body will hoard fat.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>The damage from prolonged forage restriction can be difficult to repair</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>The only way to fix your horse is to help him return to his natural state. However, the longer a horse lives as an overweight, stressed animal, the more inflammation he will have within his system, making it difficult it to bring that horse back to a normal weight, free of leptin or insulin resistance. Years of enduring forage restriction will definitely take its toll. But the solution is not to continue down this destructive path; the solution is to try to make things better.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn5″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref5″ name=”_ednref5″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[v]</sup></sup></a><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Grazing muzzles may defeat your purpose</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>If your horse tolerates a grazing muzzle, it can allow him to spend some time out on pasture with his buddies. But a muzzle can defeat your purpose if it causes frustration and its attendant cascade of stress-induced hormonal reactions. So pay attention to your horse. Even if he accepts the muzzle, limit its use to no more than 3 hours per day. Muzzles are hardly ideal—they do not really allow sufficient forage consumption for healthy digestive functioning, but the benefits of exercise and companionship in the pasture can outweigh the downside of short term reduction in forage intake. Make certain that your horse can drink water and that water drains well.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>3. The Right Environment</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Movement is so important</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Movement does more than burn calories; it keeps your horse whole, physically and psychologically. Confinement to a small paddock (even though it is outdoors), or worse, to a stall, for hours on end, reduces circulation, increases the horse’s sense of vulnerability, increases susceptibility to depression, creates inflammation throughout the body, decreases the metabolic rate, reduces immune function, and depresses digestive tract motility, to name only a few outcomes. All of these have the same impact on your horse’s weight – they can lead to obesity because of the hormonal and metabolic responses that tell the horse to hold on to body fat.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Freedom to roam and interact with other horses</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Horses require the protection of a herd. They are also social animals and need the interaction of close physical contact; merely seeing other horses over the fence is not enough.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Room to roam, along with freedom to choose whether to be out in the sunlight, or under a tree, or in a shed — perceiving he has options for comfort and safety is a calming force for the horse.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Slow feeders can be wonderful when used correctly</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Slow feeders come in a variety of styles and methods.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn6″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref6″ name=”_ednref6″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[vi]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;Allow your horse to gradually become accustomed to eating from them by also providing loose hay. Feeders need to be kept full at all times, the hole size for netted styles should not be smaller than 1.5 inches, and, depending on design, they should be kept low or on the ground to simulate the horse’s natural eating stance. Provide many of them throughout his area to encourage grazing.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>4. Patience!</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>At first, he will overeat</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Give a horse all he can eat, and at first he will overeat, a lot! It can be difficult to watch. Be sure you’ve tested your hay and it is suitable. Then give him more than he could possibly eat so that there is some left over. If you don’t give him enough and he eats it all, you will not accomplish your goal. But if he has so much that he can’t finish it, and he can leave and return to find it still there, he will eventually reach the magic moment – he will walk away! Eventually, he will eat far less than he did at the beginning.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Many barn managers are not willing to do this because it seems like a waste of money. But in actuality, the horse will eat less once he self-regulates than he did when he was only getting a set ration of hay.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Give it enough time. Most horses start to self-regulate within a couple of weeks. Some take a couple of months. And those who are leptin resistant take even longer.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Sometimes it’s gas, not fat</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Forage contains large amounts of fiber, which is fermented in the horse’s hind gut (cecum and large colon), resulting in gas formation. This is normal and healthy, but it can make your horse look pregnant. This is not fat; it’s gas–otherwise known as a “hay belly.” Do not let it concern you. Your horse will adjust. If it gets excessive, however, it would be best to help out the microbial flora in the hind gut by administering a good prebiotic.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn7″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref7″ name=”_ednref7″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[vii]</sup></sup></a><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Horses will gain weight at first</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Overeating naturally leads to weight gain. But it is only temporary. Allow for movement, feed an anti-inflammatory diet, get rid of stress, and you will have a different horse.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Abandon the conventional weight loss mantra!</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>“Eat less!” This continues to be spouted by many horse owners and equine professionals. In fact, equine research in this area has revolved around reducing forage, often with “positive” results. But it is exceedingly short-sighted! What they don’t tell you is how those same horses are doing a year later. Nor do they examine the inflammatory, metabolic, endocrine, physiologic, and even hypothalamic damage in the brain that results from forage restriction.</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn8″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref8″ name=”_ednref8″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[viii]</sup></sup></a><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>We know about the damage this causes to humans. Why do we use this method with horses? Excessively reducing calories will result in weight loss. But wait! Give it some time and the weight not only creeps back but even more weight is put on. Recently, the New York Times did a piece on the “Greatest Losers,</span><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_edn9″ data-cke-saved-name=”_ednref9″ name=”_ednref9″ style=”font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);” class=””><sup><sup>[ix]</sup></sup></a><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>” a reality TV show where overweight men and women underwent extreme dieting and exercise and were praised by all in their efforts as they showed off their newly trim selves. Six years later, they were back to where they started, or worse, due to a shift in normal metabolism.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>It is no different for horses. Prolonged forage restriction ultimately resets the metabolic rate to a slower level. In addition, the body’s hormonal response changes, making it very difficult for the horse to successfully keep off the weight without sacrificing health and quality of life.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Bottom line</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>Why not simply allow your horse to be healthy? Weight loss the wrong way will ensure that your horse will get fat again. Being patient, reducing inflammation and stress, and creating a healthy environment will do the trick. Sure, take away calories from concentrated feeds – that’s fine. But never, never restrict forage.</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>&nbsp;</span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><div style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><br></span><hr align=”left” size=”1″ width=”33%”><div id=”edn1″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref1″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn1″ name=”_edn1″ class=””>[i]</a>&nbsp;For easy soaking combined with slow feeding, consider the Porta-Grazer Soaker/Feeder:<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/products/portagrazer.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/products/portagrazer.htm</a></span></div><div id=”edn2″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref2″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn2″ name=”_edn2″ class=””>[ii]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M. Testing your pasture – For peace of mind.&nbsp;<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/testingyourpastureforpeaceofmind.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/testingyourpastureforpeaceofmind.htm</a></span></div><div id=”edn3″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref3″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn3″ name=”_edn3″ class=””>[iii]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M.&nbsp;Three articles: Obesity. The real cause. The real fix;&nbsp;PPID progression can be slowed down; and The overweight horse who won’t stop eating. Leptin resistance is the key!&nbsp;Available in the Library at&nbsp;<a href=”http://www.gettyequinenutrition.com/” class=””>www.gettyequinenutrition.com</a></span></div><div id=”edn4″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref4″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn4″ name=”_edn4″ class=””>[iv]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M. Restricting Forage Is Incredibly Stressful&nbsp;<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/library/restrictingforageisincrediblystressful.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/library/restrictingforageisincrediblystressful.htm</a></span></div><div id=”edn5″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref5″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn5″ name=”_edn5″ class=””>[v]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M. Can the damaged insulin-resistant horse be fixed?<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/Canthedamagedinsulinresistanthorsebefixed.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/Canthedamagedinsulinresistanthorsebefixed.htm</a></span></div><div id=”edn6″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref6″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn6″ name=”_edn6″ class=””>[vi]</a>&nbsp;Slow feeders are offered on Dr. Getty’s Free Shipping Store:&nbsp;<a href=”http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz/slowfeeders.html” class=””>http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz/slowfeeders.html</a></span></div><div id=”edn7″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref7″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn7″ name=”_edn7″ class=””>[vii]</a>&nbsp;Ration Plus is a worthwhile prebiotic for changes in hay consumption:&nbsp;<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/ration_plus/ration_plus.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/ration_plus/ration_plus.htm</a></span></div><div id=”edn8″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref8″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn8″ name=”_edn8″ class=””>[viii]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M., Equine Digestion – It’s Decidedly Different<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/TeleSeminars/TeleseminarBooks/SpotlightonEquineNutritionTeleseminarSeries.htm” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/TeleSeminars/TeleseminarBooks/SpotlightonEquineNutritionTeleseminarSeries.htm</a>. This book will empower you with the understanding of why the horse’s digestive tract requires a steady, non-stop flow of forage.</span></div><div id=”edn9″><span style=”font-size: 10px;”><a href=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/https://pub35.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=37&amp;usernum=2983398634&amp;e=Drgill%40equiforce.com&amp;cname=Valued%20Subscriber#_ednref9″ data-cke-saved-name=”_edn9″ name=”_edn9″ class=””>[ix]</a>&nbsp;The New York Times, 2016. After “The Biggest Loser,” Their Bodies Fought to Regain Weight.<a href=”http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health/biggest-loser-weight-loss.html?emc=eta1&amp;_r=0″ class=””>http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health/biggest-loser-weight-loss.html?emc=eta1&amp;_r=0</a><br>&nbsp;</span></div></div><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”></span><div style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><div id=”edn9″><br><span style=”font-size: 10px;”>&nbsp;</span></div></div><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; font-weight: bold; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”font-size: 11px;”>This article can be found on line at<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/libary/myhorseisgainingweightonfreechoiceforage.htm” target=”_blank” class=””><span style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 102);”>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/libary/myhorseisgainingweightonfreechoiceforage.htm</span></a></span></span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”font-style: italic;”>Permission to reprint this article is granted, provided attribution is given to Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. No editorial changes may be made without her permission. Dr. Getty appreciates being notified of any publication:&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-weight: bold;”><a href=”mailto:[email protected]” target=”_blank” class=””><span style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 128);”>[email protected]</span></a></span><span style=”font-weight: bold; text-decoration: underline; color: rgb(0, 0, 102);”><a target=”_blank” href=”http://mailto:%[email protected]%22/” class=””><span style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 102);”></span></a></span></span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”><span style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”>For other articles, click on&nbsp;<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/Announcement.htm” target=”_blank” class=””><span style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 102);”>Library</span></a>&nbsp;at<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/” target=”_blank” class=””><span style=”font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 0, 102);”>&nbsp;</span><span style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 102); font-weight: bold;”>www.GettyEquineNutrition.com</span></a></span><br style=”color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 18.2px; background-color: rgb(233, 242, 230);”> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 23:08:11 +0100 Importance of Forage http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/importance-of-forage <p><span style=”font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%”>Forage is the base of the equine diet. &nbsp;No horse can survive without forage, and all horses must consume at least 1% but preferably at least 2% of their body weight every day. <br><br>Forages come in many forms: long stemmed, cubed pelleted and chopped, but the best way to feet it to horses is long stemmed.&nbsp; Horses need to chew forage for many reasons, including mental and behavioral health, dental health, increased saliva production to help prevent ulcers and most of all, excellent quality nutrition.&nbsp; <br><br>The type of horse being fed will dictate which type of forage should be used.&nbsp; For example, a racehorse will require a forage of super high quality and high caloric density, while a Shetland pony needs a more fibrous, lower calorie forage.&nbsp; Several varieties are available to choose from, and all of the following are suitable choices for most horses.<br><br></span></p><p></p><p></p> <p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 17px;”></span></p><p><b style=”font-size: 17px;”>Best choice for working and producing animals: Orchard Grass&nbsp;</b></p><p></p> <p><span style=”font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%”>Orchard grass &nbsp;is a bunch-type, tall-growing, cool-season perennial grass. </span><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>It is fast-growing and matures very early in the spring.<span class=”apple-converted-space”>&nbsp;</span>In the vegetative (leafy) stage, orchard grass is a high-quality forage. Quality declines as the plants approach maturity. Therefore, to obtain high animal performance, harvesting at an early stage of maturity is most desirable. Orchard Grass is high in fiber and has a good level of protein, vitamins and minerals.&nbsp;<br><br></span></p> <p><span style=”font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%”><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 17px;”><b>Best Choice for your Easy Keepers: Timothy-Grass<br></b></span></span></p><p></p><p></p> <p><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>Timothy-grass</span><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;is an abundant<span class=”apple-converted-space”>&nbsp;</span></span><a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial_plant” title=”Perennial plant” class=””><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; color: windowtext; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>perennial</span></a><span class=”apple-converted-space”><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;</span></span><a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poaceae” title=”Poaceae” class=””><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; color: windowtext; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>grass</span></a><span class=”apple-converted-space”><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;</span></span><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>native to most of<span class=”apple-converted-space”>&nbsp;</span></span><a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe” title=”Europe” class=””><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; color: windowtext; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>Europe</span></a><span style=”font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%”>. It is names after </span><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>Timothy Hanson, a U.S. farmer and agriculturalist said to have introduced it from New England to the southern states in the early 18th century. Timothy hay is very palatable to horses if it is cut at an earlier stage of maturity.&nbsp; Timothy hay is an excellent choice for all classes of horses, but especially those that require more fiber and lower calories and lower protein levels.&nbsp;<br><br></span></p><p></p><p></p> <p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 17px;”><b>Best Choice for Working, Breeding and Growing Horses: Alfalfa</b></span><br></p> <p><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>Alfalfa</span><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;is a&nbsp;</span><a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perennial_plant” title=”Perennial plant” class=””><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; color: windowtext; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>perennial</span></a><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;flowering plant in the pea family&nbsp;cultivated as an important&nbsp;</span><a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forage” title=”Forage” class=””><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; color: windowtext; text-decoration: none; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>forage</span></a><span style=”font-size: 12pt; line-height: 107%; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;”>&nbsp;crop in many countries around the world.&nbsp;</span><span style=”font-size:12.0pt;line-height:107%”>Alfalfa is very palatable to horses and contains very high levels of protein, soluble fiber and calcium.&nbsp; It is the best forage for working, breeding and growing horses.&nbsp; It is very useful in the diet of horses that need superior levels of nutrients and high calories.<br><br><br><br><br></span></p><p></p><p></p> Tue, 08 Dec 2015 17:17:34 +0100 Back to the Basics http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/back-to-the-basics <p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><span style=”color: rgb(102, 0, 85);”><span data-mce-mark=”1″ style=”font-size: medium;”><em><strong>What&nbsp;<u>Every</u>&nbsp;Horse Needs, Period.</strong></em></span></span></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong><span data-mce-mark=”1″ style=”font-size: small;”>by Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.</span></strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>The horse world is cluttered with feeds, supplements, and remedies all promising a better, “new and improved” horse. While many such products do in fact improve horses’ health and condition, there are certain basics that&nbsp;<em>every</em>&nbsp;horse needs, regardless of breed, age, condition, or purpose. Even seasonal or regional changes do not alter these foundational principles.</p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Water is the most important nutrient</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>It must be plentiful, clean, and of the right temperature to encourage horses to drink. A horse at maintenance, living in a temperate climate will require a minimum of ½ to 1 gallon per hundred pounds of body weight. For the 1100 lb (500 kg) horse, that equates to 5.5 to 11 gallons (21 to 42 liters) per day.<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn1″ name=”_ednref1″ class=””>[i]</a>&nbsp; However, his demand for water will increase with activity and warmer temperatures. Here are some factors to consider:</p><ul style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><li>Water must be freshened daily. Dead insects, bird droppings and excessive pond scum can poison your horse<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn2″ name=”_ednref2″ class=””>[ii]</a>. Using smaller water troughs can make cleaning easier.</li><li>Never add salt or electrolytes to your horse’s only water supply. Plain water must always be available.</li><li>Pasture is high in moisture, typically containing 60 to 80 percent water, whereas most hays have only 7 to 10% moisture.</li><li>High protein diets increase water requirements since protein can have a diuretic effect.</li><li>During cold weather, horses drink less, especially if the water is ice cold. This potentially leads to dehydration – the main cause of colic in the winter. Heating water between 45 and 60 degrees F (7 to 15 degrees C) will promote more water consumption. Be sure the heater has no exposed wires that could electrify the water source.</li><li>If you rely on creeks or ponds, the water must be moving and deep enough to not freeze.&nbsp;&nbsp;</li><li>Snow consumption will not meet your horse’s water requirement. One gallon of average snow contains only 10 ounces of water. Also, eating snow will force your horse to burn precious calories needed to keep his body temperature steady.</li></ul><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Salt is required daily, regardless of the season</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>In cold seasons, salt helps promote that all-important water consumption. In warm seasons, supplemented salt replaces what is lost from perspiration. A full-sized horse requires at least one ounce (two level tablespoons or 30 ml) of salt each day for maintenance — this much provides 12 grams of sodium. Heat, humidity, and exercise increase the horse’s need. There are several ways to accomplish this:</p><ul style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><li>Granulated salt can be offered free-choice. Check your source for prussic acid, an anti-caking agent. This contains cyanide and should be avoided.</li><li>A salt rock should be available should your horse want more. Experiment with different natural types to see what your horse enjoys most. Many horses, however, are not comfortable with constant licking.</li><li>If salt consumption is too low via free-choice feeding, calculate the amount of sodium your horse is getting from any commercial feeds or supplements and add salt accordingly. (For palatability, limit the amount to no more than 1 tablespoon per meal.)</li><li>Do not offer electrolyte supplements instead of plain salt. Electrolytes are meant to replace perspiration losses and the horse must be in good sodium balance (from salt) before adding them.</li><li>Watch the iodine content in mineralized salt preparations. Too much iodine, and not enough selenium, can damage the thyroid gland. Iodine and selenium intakes need to be similar.</li></ul><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Forage is the foundation of the diet – it must flow through the digestive tract 24/7</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>Horses are grazing animals and are designed to consume forage virtually all day and night, only taking a few minutes here and there to rest; this also includes ponies, minis, donkeys, and mules. There are many reasons why your horse must always have hay and/or pasture:</p><ul style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><li>The horse’s stomach produces acid continuously, even when empty. The acid in an empty stomach can lead to the formation of ulcers anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract.</li><li>The cecum, where fiber is fermented, has its entrance and exit at the top; therefore, it must be full in order to evacuate digested forage. If not, substances sink to the bottom, potentially leading to impactions and sand colic.</li><li>The digestive tract consists of muscles which are “exercised” by the steady flow of forage. “Flabby” muscles can twist or intussuscept (telescope)—increasing the risk of colic.</li><li>An empty stomach causes incredible stress, creating a hormonal response that raises insulin, an inflammatory hormone that can potentiate laminitis.</li><li>Stress from forage restriction can lead to obesity, a damaged metabolic rate, laminitis relapses, and inflammation of the hypothalamic region of the brain, accelerating the development of leptin resistance and even Cushing’s disease.<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn3″ name=”_ednref3″ class=””>[iii]</a></li><li>Elevated stress also impacts immune function, making your horse more susceptible to infections and allergies, as well as negative reactions to vaccinations.</li></ul><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>Don’t let anyone scare you into thinking that feeding hay free-choice will damage your horse. Please read “Equine Digestion – It’s Decidedly Different” to empower you with the knowledge needed to help your horses.<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn4″ name=”_ednref4″ class=””>[iv]</a>&nbsp; Hay testing and commercially available “slow feeders” are worthwhile for many horses.<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn5″ name=”_ednref5″ class=””>[v]</a>&nbsp;</p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Replace what hay is missing</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>Many horses rely entirely on hay for their forage needs. Is hay nutritious? Not very. Hay is dead grass; it no longer contains many of the vitamins, omega 3s and omega 6s it once had as living pasture. It does, however, contain protein, carbohydrates, and minerals, and is a significant source of energy. Consider the following to fill in the nutritional gaps:</p><ul style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><li>Add a comprehensive vitamin/mineral supplement that offers what hay is missing –&nbsp; beta carotene (or vitamin A), vitamin D, and vitamin E.</li><li>Vitamin C is lost in hay; however, young horses’ bodies produce adequate amounts. As horses age, the liver can become less efficient at synthesizing this vitamin.</li><li>Add a variety of protein sources by feeding several types of forages. When only one type of hay is fed, the protein quality of the diet is poor and can prevent your horse from replacing and repairing tissues throughout the body.</li><li>Sunlight exposure is needed for vitamin D production. The precursor to vitamin D is naturally found in grass, but diminishes the longer hay is stored.</li><li>Simulate the fatty acid content of grasses by providing a feed source that has more omega 3s than omega 6s. Chia seeds or ground flaxseeds are good choices.<a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_edn6″ name=”_ednref6″ class=””>[vi]</a></li></ul><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Movement, companionship and shelter are vital necessities</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong><em>Horses need to move and have the protection of a buddy.</em></strong>&nbsp;Standing in a small area for hours on end (even if part of it is outdoors) takes its toll on your horse’s mental and physical health. So does being isolated from buddies. The stress can be so great that it dramatically diminishes your horse’s quality and length of life by compromising his immune system and hormonal responses. We see the effect in a vast variety of health issues:</p><ul style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><li>Obesity, insulin resistance, loss of muscle mass, and sluggish metabolic rate</li><li>Porous bones and potential fractures</li><li>Inadequate blood circulation, reducing the flow of nutrients and oxygen to the feet, joints, tendons/ligaments, and hair follicles</li><li>Potential for digestive disorders including colic, ulcers, and diarrhea&nbsp;</li><li>Compensatory behavior, including weaving, stall-walking, pawing, wall-kicking, chewing, head-bobbing, self-biting, and even cribbing&nbsp;</li><li>Slowed cartilage and joint development in growing horses</li><li>Accelerated aging, increasing susceptibility to infections, insect-borne diseases, and&nbsp; allergic responses</li><li>Increased oxidative stress, promoting degenerative diseases such as arthritis and equine Cushing’s disease at a younger age</li></ul><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>Horses also need shelter from harsh weather. This can best be accomplished by&nbsp;<em>offering your horse the option to make choices.</em>Barn stalls that can be entered and left at will through open gates allow your horse to decide what is most comfortable.</p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><strong>Bottom line</strong></p><p style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”>Horses are individuals and may need additional nutrients and care, but covering the basics of water, salt, forage, necessary supplementation, movement, stress reduction, and shelter will optimize your horse’s foundation for a lifetime of vibrant health.</p><hr style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><div style=”color: rgb(0, 0, 68); font-family: verdana, arial, helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal;”><div id=”edn1″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref1″ name=”_edn1″ class=””>[i]</a>&nbsp;Chastine, M.N., 2009. You can lead a horse to water…&nbsp; The University of Montana Western Equine Studies Program.&nbsp;<a href=”http://www.aaep.org/info/horse-health?publication=867″ target=”_blank” class=””>http://www.aaep.org/info/horse-health?publication=867</a></span></p></div><div id=”edn2″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref2″ name=”_edn2″ class=””>[ii]</a>&nbsp;University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. 2015. Blue-green algae poisoning in horses.&nbsp;<em>The Horse.</em>http://www.thehorse.com/articles/29469/blue-green-algae-poisoning-in-horses</span></p></div><div id=”edn3″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref3″ name=”_edn3″ class=””>[iii]</a>&nbsp;Please read articles related to insulin resistance, overweight, and leptin resistance found by clicking on “Library” at&nbsp;<a href=”http://www.gettyequinenutrition.com/” target=”_blank” class=””>www.gettyequinenutrition.com</a></span></p></div><div id=”edn4″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref4″ name=”_edn4″ class=””>[iv]</a>&nbsp;Getty, J.M. 2013.&nbsp;<em>Equine Nutrition – It’s Decidedly Different.</em>&nbsp;Available at&nbsp;<a href=”http://www.gettyequinenutrition.com/” target=”_blank” class=””>www.gettyequinenutrition.com</a>&nbsp;or online bookstores.</span></p></div><div id=”edn5″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref5″ name=”_edn5″ class=””>[v]</a>&nbsp;A variety of slow feeders is available at Dr. Getty’s Free Shipping Store:&nbsp;<a href=”http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz/slowfeeders.html” target=”_blank” class=””>http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz/slowfeeders.html</a></span></p></div><div id=”edn6″><p><span style=”font-size: 9px;”><a title=”” href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/inbox.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;cache=HVB9DTYIegIZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-D6Sz8tQaDatxDdAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZNZZZZZJy2ZZZZZZqFTZZZZZZZZTUZZZyRZZZZHZZZZuZZZZZ;;&amp;fld=HF6Xg,U;&amp;open=24#_ednref6″ name=”_edn6″ class=””>[vi]</a>&nbsp;Nutra Flax and U.S. Chia can be found at Dr. Getty’s Free Shipping Store. Other sources such as high-DHA algae from a vegetarian source and Camelina oil are also available.&nbsp;<a href=”http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz/” target=”_blank” class=””>http://horsesupplements.gettyequinenutrition.biz</a></span></p><p><span data-mce-mark=”1″ style=”font-size: xx-small;”><em>For permission to reprint this article, in part or in its entirety, please contact Dr. Getty directly at</em>&nbsp;<a href=”https://webmail.networksolutionsemail.com/edgedesk/cgi-bin/compose.exe?id=01e502e8a342bc3965de3f27809a5aebc519&amp;new=&amp;xsl=compose.xsl&amp;[email protected]” target=”_blank” class=””>[email protected]</a>&nbsp; It can be found on line at<a href=”http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/library/whateveryhorseneedsperiod.htm” target=”_blank” class=””>http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/library/whateveryhorseneedsperiod.htm</a></span></p></div></div> Tue, 01 Dec 2015 15:27:30 +0100 OmegaTri and the Equine – Reducing Inflammation, Restoring Balance http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/omega-tri-and The topic of oil supplementation for the horse is a common discussion among horse owners. Often when you walk into someone’s feed room you may see bottles of corn oil, sunflower oil, or fish oil. What are these oils trying to accomplish? For some, it might be to improve coat quality or to help add weight, but the type of oil product that will be looked at today has another purpose – reducing inflammation and restoring balance to the equine diet.&nbsp;<br><br><a class=”” title=”” href=”http://www.equiforce.com/omegatri.aspx”>OmegaTri&nbsp;</a>oil is different from the oil products that you may see stocked in a feed room. Produced from cold pressed unrefined flaxseed oil, sunflower oil, and olive oil, OmegaTri is a blend of pure vegetarian seed oil. This blend provides the correct balance of 3:6:9 Omega fatty acids to increase the overall Omega 3 content in the equine diet.&nbsp;<br><br>The equine diet is often devoid of Omega 3 and overloaded with Omega 6. What happens when the equine diet has too much Omega 6 over Omega 3? Well, the diagram below gives a simple answer to this:<br><br><div style=”text-align: center;”><img class=”yui-img” src=”http://equinenutritionhealth.com/resources/Omega3Diagram.JPG”><br></div>Too much Omega 6 actually can lead to inflammatory effects, while Omega 3 leads to anti-inflammatory effects. While you do not want too much Omega 6, it is necessary to have some in the diet for the balance. That is why OmegaTri is a simple solution to the balance of Omega 3 fatty acids; you can be sure that your horse is receiving the proper balance he needs. OmegaTri also provides 54% Linolenic Acid, which is the Omega 3 fatty acid that is converted into Decosahexaenoic Acid (DHA), a powerful anti-inflammatory.<br><br>When that proper balance is obtained and maintained through OmegaTri, it helps:<br><ul><li>Reduce inflammation in the body</li><li>Increase immune response</li><li>Reduce oxidative damage</li><li>Improve hormonal balance</li><li>Improve inflammatory bowel conditions</li><li>Horses that bleed during intense exercise</li><li>Improve semen characteristics, such as the number of live sperm and viability</li></ul>Balancing the Omega fatty acid content in the equine diet can be confusing, but it does not have to. Let&nbsp;<a class=”” title=”” href=”http://www.equiforce.com/omegatri.aspx”>OmegaTri&nbsp;</a>do the work.<br> Tue, 11 Feb 2014 21:48:03 +0100 Muzzle, Stall or Dry Lot? http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/muzzle-stall-or-dry-lot-determining-the-best-way-to-manage-metabolically-challenged-horses-on-pasture- <p><b><span style=”font-size: 12px; line-height: 1.22;”>Determining the Best Way to Manage Metabolically Challenged Horses on Pasture.</span><br></b></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>Amy M Gill, PhD</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>We all have had at least one or two horses that cannot be left to free range on pasture due to risk of laminitis or colic, seem to gain weight while barely eating anything and are clearly metabolically challenged and may have Cushing’s disease, impaired glucose metabolism and/or insulin resistance. &nbsp;Trying to manage these horses on turn out can be a nightmare, especially if you live in an area where pasture is rich and abundant. But with some forethought and planning, a happy medium can be found for both you and your horse, so that ever one can be happy and stress free!</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>Before discussing pasturing options, let’s take a quick look at the basic management strategies that should be employed for our easy keepers:</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>•<span class=”Apple-tab-span” style=”white-space:pre”> </span>Feed low calorie hay that has been checked low in starches and sugars so that the horse can have ample amounts to eat continuously. Triple Crown Safe Starch is the perfect forage products for this type of horse as it is a fully fortified, complete forage based feed.</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>•<span class=”Apple-tab-span” style=”white-space:pre”> </span>Use a Protein, Vitamin and Mineral supplement &nbsp;such as Triple Crown 30% to supply these nutrients without adding extra calories from grains and fats if you are feeding medium to lower quality hay.</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>•<span class=”Apple-tab-span” style=”white-space:pre”> </span>Exercise on a daily basis to maintain healthy organs, muscle, hoof and reduce insulin resistance</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>•<span class=”Apple-tab-span” style=”white-space:pre”> </span>If Insulin resistance has been diagnosed, supplement accordingly with targeted nutrients that have been shown to help improve this imbalance. &nbsp;Be sure to check with an equine nutritionist for advice on how to do this correctly.</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>•<span class=”Apple-tab-span” style=”white-space:pre”> </span>Minimize stress from herd mates, heat, flies, hunger and boredom as these all increase cortisol levels which in turn increases metabolic imbalances</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>Deciding how to limit pasture intake for an individual horse depends on your boarding set up and the individual horse’s personality. &nbsp;Management of the at risk horse may also require using several different techniques in rotation. &nbsp;The ideal situation is to turn the horse out in a muzzle with his buddies. Most horses prefer staying with the herd, still being able to eat a small amount of fresh forage and benefit greatly from the exercise provided by free ranging. &nbsp;Some horses however, greatly resent the muzzle and this could increase stress. &nbsp;I have seen a significant number of horses take up cribbing after being muzzled for several years. &nbsp;If the horse is one that is prone to vices, muzzling continuously when pastured may not be ideal for that individual. &nbsp;A combination of dry lot one day or evening and muzzle the next may be more effective as it “breaks” up the monotony of only one routine. This is the ideal set up for most horses that must have restricted pasture.</span></p><p><span class=”yui-tag-span yui-tag” tag=”span” style=”font-size: 12px;”>Leaving the horse in a stall most of the time is the least desirable way to manage a chubby horse. &nbsp;Stress, lack of movement and exercise, isolation all lead to a miserable horse that will be more prone to injury and disease as well. For the well- being of the horse – Find a way to get ‘em out!</span></p><div><br></div><p></p><p></p> Tue, 08 Oct 2013 18:27:36 +0100 Managing Horses on Fall Pastures http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/managing-horses-on-fall-pastures <p><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>As we head into fall, it’s time to plan for changes in the nutritional needs of your horses and those of the pastures they have been grazing.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>After a long hot summer, many pastures become overgrazed, over run with weeds and possibly contain toxic plants.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>If there has been insufficient rainfall in your area, the entire pasture may be in poor condition. At this point, not much nutrition is available from the pasture for the horses grazing it, so alterations to their daily rations must be considered. Here are some tips on how to keep horses healthy on fall pastures and to help prepare the pasture for the next growing season.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>The best way to keep pastures healthy and providing good quality nutrition is to prevent overstocking and when needed, rotate horses off pasture for six weeks to allow for adequate re-growth before re-introducing horses. In general, pastures that are stocked with more than 1 horse for every two acres will not be able to withstand grazing for much more than a couple weeks, especially during the dry fall season.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Furthermore, if overstocked pastures become badly overgrazed, it is much more difficult and expensive to rehabilitate them with seeding and fertilizing.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>This type of pasture also tends to grow a variety of weeds and noxious plants.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Hungry horses will eat whatever is available to them and this can be a problem if they ingest plants that are poisonous.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>Therefore, if your pastures are overstocked, it is best to divide the pasture into several paddocks and graze the horses in each paddock until they have eaten it down to about two inches, then relocate them to the next paddock and continue doing this as needed. This can easily be done with electric portable fencing. Each paddock should get a rest of about 4-6 weeks depending on the weather conditions or until re-growth is 4 to 6 inches high. Spring and fall is the time when every pasture should be reseeded and fertilized based on the results of a soil test.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Doing this twice yearly ensures the best possible growth and health of the pasture.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>If you are unsure how to go about seeding and fertilizing, check with your local farm store or the county extension agent.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>It is also very important to drag the pasture with a chain harrow to break up the manure piles.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>This helps to kill parasite larvae as well as fertilize the pasture.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Chain harrowing may need to be done once a week or so if the pasture is stocked with quite a few horses. A typical horse, which weighs about 1,000 pounds, produces between 45 and 55 pounds of manure per day, or around nine tons per year!<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>Horses that are sensitive to fructans and sugars in the grass, such as insulin resistant horses and those prone to laminitis and founder should be managed closely on fall pastures.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Cool season grass growth will increase at this time due to colder temperatures at night.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Grasses will concentrate sugars and fructans to prevent freezing, creating rapid growth in preparation for the dormant winter season.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>It may be best to muzzle sugar sensitive horses or withdraw them from pasture all together this time of year.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Having a dry lot to put these horses in, helps manage their intake and controlled forage feeding can be employed to assure they remain safe and healthy.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>Depending on what type of horse(s) you have and their activity level, it may be advantageous to supplement hay or a hay replacement to provide additional fiber, starting in late summer.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>This prevents the horses from overgrazing the pasture as well as preserving trees, fencing, barns and anything else that is edible. Once pasture growth trails off, the amount of energy or calories, as well as vitamin and mineral concentration, is greatly reduced. Horses that are still performing, growing or lactating will need additional fortification besides pasture. High quality forage products such as Triple Crown Grass Forage and Triple Crown Alfalfa Forage can supplement poor pasture or inconsistent quality hays.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage provides quality grass forage, below 10% NSC that is fortified with a vitamin and mineral pellet – a great choice when managing horses with metabolic issues.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span><p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>For those horse owners whose pastures will soon be covered with snow, now may be a good time to consider switching to a complete feed. When pasture is non-existent, inconsistent hay quality and/or supply can spell trouble for your horse in the middle of winter.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Feeding a complete feed that is formulated to provide additional good quality fiber can help your horse maintain a healthy digestive tract and cut down on wood chewing during the colder months.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Products like Equine Promise Lean Fit and Reflections are high in digestible fiber and can help replace the calories no longer available from pasture.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>The change in seasons can be a great time to review management practices and feeding programs.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Now is the time to double check you are up to date on vaccinations, teeth floating and you should consult with your farrier to determine if a seasonal change in shoeing is recommended.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Check to see if your feeding program is meeting the needs of all your horses, are you using lots of supplements, can your feeding program be streamlined for better results and lower costs.<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><font size=”3″><font face=”Times New Roman”>Remember, maintaining prudent horse husbandry practices and close attention to detail will keep your horse in peak condition no matter what the weather is like outside!<p></p></font></font></p><p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font></p> Tue, 03 Sep 2013 18:55:43 +0100 Is Botulism a Serious Threat to my Horse? http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/is-botulism-a-serious-threat-to-my-horse <p><b>A review of what causes botulism and how to prevent it.</b></p>What Causes Botulism? <p>Botulism is caused by toxins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>Horses can consume the bacterial spores from soil and feedstuffs.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>Most often it is found in forage where an animal carcass has been baled with the forage. Botulism can also gain entry through wounds.</p> <p>What are the signs of a horse that is affected?</p> <p>Botulism causes a paralysis of the motor nerves that are responsible for muscle movement. Signs of botulism are weakness and difficulty eating or swallowing. Foals can become very weak and shake due to muscle weakness and they are called “shaker foals” for this reason. Adult horses can also have muscle shaking and may have a hard time even lifting their head.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>They lose tone in the tail and eyelids and usually cannot stand up. </p> <p>Can an affected horse be successfully treated?</p> <p>Horses can survive Botulism but the treatment is costly and the recovery is slow.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>Round the clock nursing care is required because most affected horses cannot eat or drink and must be fed via stomach tube and intravenously. Supportive therapy requires administration of botulism antitoxin, which binds the botulism toxin in the blood circulation. Unfortunately, once botulism toxin has bound to the nerve, it cannot be reversed and the horse’s body must regenerate its own nerve-muscle junctions. <span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp;</span>Antibiotics such as penicillin and metronidazole can kill C. botulinum bacteria, if present.</p> <p>How can Botulism be prevented?</p> <p>Prevention of botulism involves routine vaccination of foals and adult horses and careful feeding practices. Most cases of botulism in the United States are caused by type B botulism and there is a commercially available vaccine against botulism is for type B. An initial series of three monthly vaccinations is recommended for unvaccinated horses, followed by yearly boosters. It is especially important to vaccinate pregnant mares so that antibodies are passed to foals in colostrum.</p> <p>Feeding carefully harvested forages is the best way to prevent horses from ingesting botulism toxin.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>Do not feed, dusty, moldy wet hay to horses.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>If any dead animals are found in the hay, discard it immediately. Rounds baled hay has the highest risk of containing botulism because it is baled with a high moisture content which is an environment that is hospitable for botulism. <span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp;</span>Bagged, chopped forages are usually of very high quality and would be a good alternative if clean, properly harvested baled forage is unavailable.</p> <p>Always keep open wounds clean and dressed.</p> <p>Is there a high risk of my horse contracting Botulism?</p> <p>No.<span style=”mso-spacerun:yes”>&nbsp; </span>The Mid-Atlantic States and Kentucky are where most of the spores are found in the dirt, but the incidence of the disease is low. So long as good horse husbandry practices are observed, the risk of horses contracting botulism is small.</p> Mon, 12 Aug 2013 18:24:39 +0100 Slow feeding….What it Means for the Health of Your Horse. http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/slow-feeding…-what-is-means-for-the-health-of-your-horse- <br><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Though it’s not really anyone’s fault per se, today’s modern horse keeping practices have unfortunately forced horses<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>into sedentary lifestyles where free ranging and getting plenty of exercise foraging for foodstuffs has essentially become a thing of the past.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>To compound the problem of too little exercise, many horses are often fed excessive amounts of concentrated rations and high calorie, nutrient dense forages. Horses have evolved by nature to store energy (fat) and nutrients in times when feedstuffs are in abundance in order to survive when food is sparse. This may well be protective under conditions of feast-and-famine where efficient fat deposition is advantageous. While this survival mechanism may have been effective keeping horses alive during the ice age, it is wreaking havoc with the physiological well-being of the twenty first century horse!<br><br></font></font><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>The modern, domesticated horse does not face winter without food anymore and some horses, when presented with an abundance of feeds on a regular basis, quickly develop an obese stature, especially when coupled with limited physical activity. Many of these horses have then become resistant to the effects of Insulin, the hormone released from the pancreas in response to an increase in blood glucose following the ingestion of a starch meal. Insulin resistance and aberrant carbohydrate metabolism play a role in disorders such as Cushing’s disease, Insulin Resistance, Laminitis, Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyolysis, and Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy. These disorders may be directly linked to the inability of certain individuals to metabolize large amounts of starch over long periods of time. Over time, they all have deleterious effects on the health of the horse and in most cases require intense medical and nutritional intervention to avoid premature death.</font></font><p><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Nutritionists are now recommending that most horses be fed a diet low in soluble carbohydrates, high in fiber and lower in calories.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>To achieve this, many horses are now offered grain-free rations and lower quality forages that can be consumed in higher amounts and more continuously for both the mental and physical health of the horse. These contemporary diets have helped immensely with cutting down on calories, starches and sugars, but another problem still persists.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Because these feeds are so concentrated and are fed in large meals usually only once or twice daily, many horses are eating too much food, too fast, and all at once.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>By gobbling up the entire ration in a short period of time, they spend the rest of the day with nothing to eat, or do…which can lead to stables vices and many physical problems that stem from an unhealthy hind gut.</font></font></p><p><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Slow feeders are popping up in the market place and are certainly one way of forcing a horse to eat slower and more deliberately.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Many variations of hay feeding systems have become available, from tanks or tubs with grates and small holes that the hay sits under, to large durable bags that can hold a few flakes or entire bales. Many people have devised their own systems that work well in their individual situation.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>However, it is achieved, slow feeding forage helps regulate feed intake and prevent horses from spending long periods of time with nothing to eat or do.</font></font></p><p><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>But what about slow feeding of the concentrate portion of the ration?<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Years ago, a couple mechanized grain feeders came on the market.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>They were programmable to feed small amounts multiple times per day.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>The concept was brilliant but unfortunately, may have been before its time.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>The price of the technology probably did not help create lift off in the equine world either.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>Nowadays however, the concept of slow feeding grain is starting to take a hold in barns across the globe.</font></font></p><p><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>One particular slow grain or treat feeder, the Nose-It! helps not only deliver feed in small amounts but also provides much needed mental stimulation for the stalled or paddocked horse.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>The unit is not round, it has a unique and distinct patented twelve (12) sided “SLOW-ROLL ONE EDGE AT A TIME™” design so the problem of it rolling out of bounds is minimized.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>The ability of the horse to push the Nose-It™! and receive a small grain or treat reward is not only mentally stimulating but also simulates natural browsing and foraging patterns.<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>This feeding pattern will help keep a constant flow of digesta in the digestive tract which is a major factor in maintaining stabilization of the hind gut.</font></font></p><p><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>So which horses should be fed with “slow” feeding methods?<span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>&nbsp; </span>All of them, but especially horses that are:</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Metabolically challenged with: Insulin Resistance, Cushing’s Disease, Tying-up, muscle disorders and intolerance to exercise</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Prone to eating too fast and risk choking on feedstuffs</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Stabled or paddocked for long periods of time</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Shipping long distances</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Recovering from illness or surgery</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Require a lot of feed to maintain body condition, such as show horses, race horses, competitive driving and trail horses</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle” style=”margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Horses that exhibit behavioral vices</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p class=”MsoListParagraphCxSpLast” style=”margin: 0in 0in 10pt 0.5in; text-indent: -0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1;”><!–[if !supportLists]–><span style=”font-family: Symbol; mso-fareast-font-family: Symbol; mso-bidi-font-family: Symbol;”><span style=”mso-list: Ignore;”><font size=”3″>·</font><span style=’font: 7pt/normal “Times New Roman”; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal;’>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><!–[endif]–><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Young, growing horses and broodmares that must consume a lot of feed for high rates of growth</font></font></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font><p style=”margin: 0in 0in 10pt;”><font size=”3″><font face=”Calibri” style=”font-size: 14px;”>Does your horse need a slow feeding system?</font></font><p></p><p></p><font face=”Times New Roman” size=”3″> </font> Fri, 12 Jul 2013 18:28:22 +0100 Equine Immunity: How Nutrition Can Improve Immune Response http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/equine-immunity-how-nutrition-can-improve-immune-response Keeping horses healthy and free of disease and disorders is a hot topic of conversation in many popular press journals, magazines and on the internet.&nbsp; Horse husbandry advice ranges from nutrition to shoeing and veterinary care. Commonly offered suggestions on good horse health management generally start with the following list of recognized techniques:&nbsp;<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Employ qualified veterinary and farrier care and routine management such as de-worming and vaccinating<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Feed good quality forages and low starch, high fat and fiber concentrates that are balanced and offered in the correct amounts to meet the optimal nutrient requirements the type of horse being fed.&nbsp;<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Provide access to fresh water and salt at all times which are critical for electrolyte and hydration status.&nbsp;<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Provide adequate exercise and access to turnout if possible. Both are now readily recognized as required to help prevent the development of stereotypic behavior (vices) and keeping the digestive tract as well as the musculo-skeletal system of the horse functioning properly. <br><br>Other recommendations include the use of various medications and supplements to help combat a host of disorders and unsoundness’s, with one of most common being a malfunctioning digestive tract. Most commonly included in this category is: colic, gastric ulcers and sub-clinical acidosis caused by too much starch in the hindgut of the tract which can also lead to laminitis if left un-checked.<br><br>All of the above guidelines are integral in helping the horse stay be and stay healthy.&nbsp; But can the role of nutrition be even larger?&nbsp; The answer is yes and here is how:<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;A recent study using mice revealed that omega-3 fatty acids promote an immune response known as a T helper-1 response, or Th1 response. T helper cells are a type of white blood cell known as lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are important because they play a role in directing and activating other white blood cells, whose activity helps to prevent illness.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Animal experiments and clinical intervention studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids have potent anti-inflammatory properties and, therefore, might be useful in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Emerging science shows probiotics are powerful components of immune system health and because as much as 60% of immune cells are located in the digestive tract, it makes sense that keeping those cells functioning well is vitally important for a horse to stay healthy.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Extra supplementation of some vitamins and minerals can be extremely helpful in keeping the immune system healthy and fighting off infection. Zinc, selenium, iron, copper, vitamins A, C, E, and B-6; and folic acid have important influences on immune responses and may be needed in higher than maintenance requirements under stressful circumstances.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Phytonutrients are a wide variety of plant-derived substances that have specific immune-augmenting capabilities. Included in this category are garlic, Echinacea, arabinogalactan from larch tree bark, cat’s claw, astragalus, maitake mushroom, and yeast-derived beta 1, 3 D-glucans. Beta-1, 3/1, 6 D-glucan from purified yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is a biological defense modifier (BDM) which potentiates and modulates immune response. Beta-1, 3/1, 6 D-glucan activates white cells which are responsible for scavenging pathogens.<br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;•&nbsp;Herbs are typically used to treat short-term, acute infections through the stimulation of immune activity. Immunostimulants help the body to resist infection during the beginning stages of infection, as well as throughout the duration of infectious illness.<br><br>The immune system acts to protect the horse from infectious agents that exist in the environment (bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites) and from other noxious insults. The adequate functioning of the equine immune system can be largely affected by nutrition, and therefore so is the increased risk of illness if excellent quality nutrition is not available. Providing optimal intake of energy, macronutrients and micronutrients and alternative nutrition helps to improve the immune system, and are fundamental to protect the health of the horse. <br> Wed, 10 Jul 2013 19:03:49 +0100 Fighting Fly Allergies & Mosquito Borne Diseases Starts With A Proactive Understanding Of … http://equinenutritionhealth.com/our-blog/fighting-fly-allergies-mosquito-borne-diseases-starts-with-a-proactive-understanding-of-these-problems It Takes More Than Insect Repellent To Manage Fly Allergies &amp; Mosquito Control Issues. Learn How To Prepare Yourself For This Season’s Pest Control Problems.<br>Amy M Gill, PhD<br><br>With trees and shrubs blooming and fly season approaching, you need to prepare your barn and horses for the upcoming warm weather and all the pollen, insects and mud that can wreak havoc on coats and hooves. Many horses develop allergies to environmental irritants and various flies. Here are a few things that can keep your horses comfortable as they transition from winter to spring:<br><br><ul><li>Clean out your barn (power wash if possible), sweep out stalls and aisles and fill with fresh bedding </li><li>Remove all manure piles in or close to the barn </li><li>Put all feed in closed containers </li><li>Install a fly control system or hang fly strips </li><li>Hang fans on doors and install attic fans if possible </li><li>Wash all summer sheets and fly masks using fragrance-free detergent </li><li>Purchase a good fly spray that can be safely used on your horse and in the barn </li><li>Provide shelter to pastured horses </li><li>Treat ponds and lakes to limit algae which attracts insects </li><li>Spray trees in and around pastures for mosquitos and other bothersome insects </li><li>Release predator flies periodically throughout the warm season </li><li>Keep pastures and fields harrowed and mowed</li></ul><br>Certain insect-related skin issues are difficult to deal with once they start. Some insect bites can even set off allergic reactions—in particular, sweet itch, an allergic reaction to the saliva of the culicoides midge. When a horse is bitten by a midge, its immune system normally recognizes a foreign protein and reacts to eliminate the substance. In a horse affected by sweet itch; however, the immune system overreacts and the horse exhibits a type one hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in the release of histamine. Histamine causes intense itching and swelling at the site of the bite, making the horse rub and scratch, leading to skin damage and possible infection.<br><br>Once a horse is affected by sweet itch, it is hard to eliminate. Be sure to stable the horse during the day until around 8 p.m., particularly on days with no breeze. Fans on the stall doors and in the barn roof can keep air moving and prevent midges from entering the barn. Lightweight summer rugs and fly sheets also help, but should fully enclose the neck and belly to be most effective.<br><br>Fly and insect repellents also help keep midges away. Permethrins and Benzyl Benzoate have been used successfully. Benzyl Benzoate should be applied daily and worked into the affected area; however, it is an irritant to skin, particularly broken skin, and therefore needs to be used as a preventative rather than a treatment once itchiness starts.<br><br>Manage symptoms with antihistamines such as hydroxyzine and with corticosteroids, although the potential side effects (e.g. laminitis, immune suppression) make steroids a less preferred treatment. If secondary infections occur, antibiotics are needed.<br><br>Other tips for keeping horses free of skin problems in spring and summer include:<br><br><ul><li>Horses with sun sensitivity such as light coated horses and those with a lot of white skin should be stabled during the day and turned out in the evening with fly sheets and masks. Applying sunscreen to vulnerable areas really helps protect the skin. </li><li>Keep horses out of muddy areas as much as possible. Water causes hoof walls to dry out and crumble. Mud can cause skin irritation as well. </li><li>Feeding an Omega-3 fatty acid supplement such as OmegaTri Omega 3 Fatty Acid supplement form Equi-Force Equine Products increases immune response and helps increase collagen production in the skin and hoof. This can be very useful in the warm months to strengthen a horse’s immune and alimentary systems. </li><li>Bathe horses frequently with gentle shampoo to get dirt and sweat out of their coats. Clean horses are less itchy and don’t attract flies as much as dirty ones!</li></ul><br> Fri, 24 May 2013 19:37:47 +0100